Archive for October, 2007

It is You [Alone] we worship, and You [Alone] we ask for help

October 28, 2007

http://www.geocities.com/doctorsaab84/al-fate7ah.ram

click.. put your sound up.

time: less than 2 minutes

Surah al Fatiha (the Opening): First chapter of the Qur’an

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Muslim women are oppressed??

October 22, 2007

I’m taking a justice studies class and we are currently reviewing intimate partner relationships.

There are a few points that have left me amazed and awestruck; how could ISLAM ever be labeled as anti-women, or oppressive to women? ESPECIALLY by the American people. Do you realize how much women have had to go through in our country in order to gain BASIC human rights?

For example, laws on domestic violence did not exist. In the late 1800s, when the feminist movement really started, it was normal for women to be beaten by their husbands. It was very normal to say, “Oh, she’s just a woman.”

One of the first legal decisions was that women should be treated at least as well as PIGS are treated.

This is similar to the Mary Ellen case in the mid-late 1800s. Mary Ellen, a young child, was severely beaten by her stepmother. There were absolutely no child protection laws through which the stepmother could be convicted. But the law looked at the fact that there were ANIMAL treatment laws, and thus they could try her stepmother based on those laws.

Compare that with the Qur’an [revealed over 1400 years ago] and examples from the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him. We’re talking in the middle of the desert of Arabia. How could anyone claim Muslim women are oppressed?! Women’s rights [not outlined here, but are enormous and more progressive than women in America have now, even with the feminist movement], and the necessary kindness that men should have with women, were divinely revealed in the middle of chaotic, women-inherited, pagan-Arab society. With Islam, the low status of women changed to one equitable with men within a period of 23 years.

Did you just read that? A 23 year period. We learned in class that it takes about 100 years for society to change their cultural attitudes and ways. Is there any way that oppressive pagan-arab society to women, children, slaves, and the poor, could have transformed into one which every person is considered equal in the Sight of God without it having because of God’s Divine Help to His Prophet, peace be upon him, and His Revelation (the Qur’an)? In which no one is better than the other, except if they are more God conscious? And that no one knows of who has more God consciousness except for God Himself?

Allah says in the 49th chapter of the Quran, “O mankind! We created you from a single (pair) of a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, that ye may know each other. Verily the most honoured of you in the sight of God is the most righteous of you. And God has full knowledge and is well acquainted (with all things).

The Ideal

Women in the Qur’an and Sunnah

The Qur’an

“O ye who believe! ye are forbidden to inherit women against their will. Nor should ye treat them with harshness that ye may take away part of the dower ye have given them except where they have been guilty of open lewdness; on the contrary live with them on a footing of kindness and equity. If ye take a dislike to them it may be that ye dislike a thing and Allah brings about through it a great deal of good.” (Qur’an, an Nisa, 19)

The Sunnah

Helpers and Supporters of One Another

“The believers, men and women, are helpers and supporters of one another; they enjoin what is good and forbid what is evil…”

(Qur’an, At-Tawbah, 9:71).

The Best in Faith, are Those Best to Their Families

“The believers with the strongest and most complete faith are those who possess the best characters and possess the best of characters towards their wives.”

“The best of you is the best to his family…”

Honoring the Woman

“The generous and honored one is whoever dignifies them [women] and whoever harms and debases them is the wicked and debased one.”

The Mother

I said to the Holy Prophet (peace be upon him), “O Messenger of Allah, I desire to go on a (military) expedition and I have come to consult you.” He asked me if I had a mother, and when I replied that I had, he said, “Stay with her because Paradise lies beneath her feet.”

I asked, “Messenger of Allah, to whom should I be dutiful?” He replied, “Your mother.” I asked, “Then whom?” He replied, “Your mother.” I asked, “Then whom?” He replied, “Your mother.” I asked, “Then whom?” He replied, “Your mother.” I asked, “Then to whom should I be dutiful?” He replied, “Your father, and then the next closest relative and then the next.”

Academic Freedom is at Risk in America

October 20, 2007

“That Israel’s American supporters so often resort to angry outbursts rather than principled arguments — and seem to find emotional blackmail more effective than genuine debate — is ultimately a sign of their weakness rather than their strength. For all the damage it can do in the short term, in the long run such a position is untenable, too dependent on emotion and cliché rather than hard facts. The phenomenal success of Carter’s book suggests that more and more Americans are learning to ignore the scare tactics that are the only tools available to Israel’s supporters.”

-Saree Makdisi

October 18, 2007

Campuses Have Become Poisoned by an Atmosphere of Surveillance and Harassment

Academic Freedom is at Risk in America

By SAREE MAKDISI

“Academic colleagues, get used to it,” warned the pro-Israel activist Martin Kramer in March 2004. “Yes, you are being watched. Those obscure articles in campus newspapers are now available on the Internet, and they will be harvested. Your syllabi, which you’ve also posted, will be scrutinized. Your Web sites will be visited late at night.”

Kramer’s warning inaugurated an attack on intellectual freedom in the U.S. that has grown more aggressive in recent months.

This attack, intended to shield Israel from criticism, not only threatens academic privileges on college campuses, it jeopardizes our capacity to evaluate our foreign policy. With a potentially catastrophic clash with Iran on the horizon and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict spiraling out of control, Americans urgently need to be able to think clearly about our commitments and intentions in the Middle East. And yet we are being prevented from doing so by a longstanding campaign of intimidation that has terminated careers, stymied debate and shut down dialogue.

Over the past few years, Israel’s U.S. defenders have stepped up their campaign by establishing a network of institutions (such as Campus Watch, Stand With Us, the David Project, the Israel on Campus Coalition, and the disingenuously named Scholars for Peace in the Middle East) dedicated to the task of monitoring our campuses and bringing pressure to bear on those critical of Israeli policies. By orchestrating letter-writing and petitioning campaigns, falsely raising fears of anti-Semitism, mobilizing often grossly distorted media coverage and recruiting local and national politicians to their cause, they have severely disrupted academic processes, the free function of which once made American universities the envy of the world.

Outside interference by Israel’s supporters has plunged one U.S. campus after another into crisis. They have introduced crudely political — rather than strictly academic or scholarly — criteria into hiring, promotion and other decisions at a number of universities, including Columbia, Yale, Wayne State, Barnard and DePaul, which recently denied tenure to the Jewish American scholar Norman Finkelstein following an especially ugly campaign spearheaded by Alan Dershowitz, one of Israel’s most ardent American defenders.

Our campuses are being poisoned by an atmosphere of surveillance and harassment. However, the disruption of academic freedom has grave implications beyond campus walls.

When professors Stephen Walt and John Mearsheimer drafted an essay critical of the effect of Israel’s lobbying organizations on U.S. foreign policy, they had to publish it in the London Review of Books because their original American publisher declined to take it on. With the original article expanded into a book that has now been released, their invitation to speak at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs was retracted because of outside pressure. “This one is so hot,” they were told. So although Michael Oren, an officer in the Israeli army, was recently allowed to lecture the council about U.S. policy in the Middle East, two distinguished American academics were denied the same privilege.

When President Carter published “Palestine: Peace not Apartheid” last year, he was attacked for having dared to use the word “apartheid” to describe Israel’s manifestly discriminatory policies in the West Bank.

As that case made especially clear, the point of most of these attacks is to personally discredit anyone who would criticize Israel — and to taint them with the smear of “controversy” — rather than to engage them in a genuine debate. None of Carter’s critics provided a convincing refutation of his main argument based on facts and evidence. Presumably that’s because, for all the venom directed against the former president, he was right. For example, Israel maintains two different road networks, and even two entirely different legal systems, in the West Bank, one for Jewish settlers and the other for indigenous Palestinians. Those basic facts were studiously ignored by those who denounced Carter and angrily accused him of a “blood libel” against the Jewish people.

That Israel’s American supporters so often resort to angry outbursts rather than principled arguments — and seem to find emotional blackmail more effective than genuine debate — is ultimately a sign of their weakness rather than their strength. For all the damage it can do in the short term, in the long run such a position is untenable, too dependent on emotion and cliché rather than hard facts. The phenomenal success of Carter’s book suggests that more and more Americans are learning to ignore the scare tactics that are the only tools available to Israel’s supporters.

But we need to be able to have an open debate about our Middle East policy now — before we needlessly shed more blood and further erode our reputation among people who used to regard us as the champions of freedom, and now worry that we have come to stand for its very opposite.

Saree Makdisi is a professor of English and Comparative Literature at UCLA and a frequent commentator on the Middle East .

Saree Makdisi, a professor of English at UCLA, is the author of Romantic Imperialism: Universal Empire and the Culture of Modernity (Cambridge University Press, 1998) and William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s (University of Chicago Press, 2003). His new book, “Palestine Inside Out: An Everyday Occupation,” is forthcoming from Norton. Makdisi can be reached at: makdisi@humnet. ucla.edu

 

Allahu akbar

October 19, 2007

A spirituality that is so sound, a connection to Allah so strong, that the heart has no choice but to command the limbs to an activism that is unbreakable, a resolve that is unshakeable, and such Islamic work sincerely done to reach the people who have not recieved the message and to draw nearer to Allah, that would shake the foundations of this anti-Islamism that has developed on this earth. And deeds by the Believers – so pure, so free from oppression that no one would ever again question the morality of the deen of Allah (swt).

-Abdul Sattar’s blog

http://abdulsattar.wordpress.com/

What’s your plan?

October 9, 2007

Next week, Ramadan is over.

The devils are unchained and already planning to make
us weak in our iman and keep us from doing good deeds.

So what’s your plan for next week? What is my plan for
next week?

As we get to the end of this blessed month of fasting,
praying, reading Qur’an, giving charity, asking for
forgiveness and hopefully forgiving others, are we
ready for the attacks of shaytan next week?

Are we going to be serious about our daily prayers,
about reading Qur’an and doing good deeds? Why should
we not take a few minutes and make a plan now on how
we’re going to continue to worship and obey Allah
subhanahu wa ta’ala after Ramadan. How about praying
ontime, reading one page of Qur’an, sponsoring an
orphan for $1/day (givelight.org), etc.

So, what’s your plan for next week? Those who fail to
plan, plan to fail.

May Allah protect us from failing to worship and obey
Him, and help us to continue on the path of good
deeds. Ameen!

Fred

posted on http://www.suhaibwebb.com

October 9, 2007

My Mother (( Ummi )) By Ahmed Bukhatir